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U2’s “modern” comebacks proves almost successful

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[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]Having grown up listening to U2 songs, I was one of the few people excited to see U2’s new controversial album, “Songs of Innocence,” downloaded to my iPad. This album features a modern twist to their classic sound and profound meanings laced through each song.

“Songs of Innocence” is U2’s thirteenth studio album and was produced by Danger Mouse, Paul Epworth, Ryan Tedder, Declan Gaffney and Flood, who all seem to have heavy influence in the sound of the album. The band paired with Apple to make the album available to over 500 million iOS users for free, making it the largest album release of all time.

The album starts out with their lead single, “The Miracle (Of Joey Ramone),” a song backed by their usual big instrumental style but noticeably weaker vocals from Bono. These uncertain vocals prevail throughout the album and almost give it a wise rawness in each song.

All of the songs on the album are evidently U2, but with a modern pop rock flair. In doing this, U2 has made themselves more appealing to younger audiences, but perhaps not for diehard, old school U2 fans. As previously stated, you can hear the artistry from the producers along with the intimate lyrics written by Bono. The songs seem to echo the band’s life story with powerful ballads such as “Iris (Hold Me Close)” and “Cedarwood Road.”

“Songs of Innocence” is a clean-cut album with nostalgic reminders of the U2 fans have grown up loving. The modernization of their melodic rock style may not be groundbreaking, but gives them the opportunity to spread their emotive music to a new audience.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” bg_position=”left top” bg_repeat=”no-repeat” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left”][vc_column width=”1/2″][image_with_animation image_url=”2279″ animation=”Fade In” img_link_target=”_self”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/2″ animation=”none” column_padding=”no-extra-padding” background_color_opacity=”1″][tabbed_section][tab title=”Good”][vc_column_text]

  • Great big instrumental style
  • Intimate lyrics

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  • Weaker voice
  • Peculiar background vocals

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Hebron High School News Online
U2’s “modern” comebacks proves almost successful