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Hebron High School News Online

The Hawk Eye

Hebron High School News Online

The Hawk Eye

Sports Scores
A table is set up with trophies for the participants for the tournament at last year’s event on May 31, 2023.  (Photo provided by HBBC)
Band to hold golf tournament May 31
Mie Bakuya, Reporter • May 25, 2024

The band program will hold its eighth annual golf tournament on May 31 at Indian Creek Golf Course with a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. The event...

(Left to right) DFW residents Ana Szabo, Lacey Gee, Amy Nichols and Nick Adams pose for a photo at their event “Swifties in the Park” at Grandscape in The Colony on April 27. At the event, they held competitions ,such as spelling bees and “finish the lyric” for the attendees, in which winners were given vinyls and a goodie bag from the Swiftie Market. (Photo provided by @the13podcast on Instagram)
Lucky Number 13
Saahir Mawani, Design Editor • May 24, 2024

On Dec. 13, 1989, global phenomenon Taylor Swift was bornin the town of Reading, PA. Only two years later, in 1992, the KiddKradick morning show...

Senior Jimmy Sanchez and junior Grant Koch perform a scene during a dress rehearsal of “The Diviners” on April 18. This was the only show strictly performed by theater’s Silver Company this year.
For the applause
Krista Fleming, Managing Editor • May 23, 2024

The stage is dark.  Junior Grant Koch is in the same spot he has been in for what feels like a thousand times, surrounded by cast members...

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Print Edition

Opinion: School choice is more coercion than free will

A microphone at a rally for school choice in Arizona. Out of all the states that have implemented school voucher programs Arizona has one of the largest school choice programs in the country.
Photo Via Gage Skidmore, CC BY 2.0
A microphone at a rally for school choice in Arizona. Out of all the states that have implemented school voucher programs Arizona has one of the largest school choice programs in the country.

American public education is a dying beast, and the vultures have already started circling it. Today’s students are more distracted than ever. Reading and math scores are at their lowest point since 1971. The system behind school funding is designed to disproportionately set up wealthier districts with more funding while leaving behind poorer, inner-city and rural areas, with clear racial undertones. Additionally, just like every other underfunded public service, privatization comes right around the corner. 

“School choice” is the term currently used by proponents of privatization. The idea revolves around state education funds being sent directly to parents in the form of vouchers, to help parents pay the cost of tuition at private schools. The idea, while innocent in nature, leaves out the part where the money comes from: public schools. 

Public education is already inadequately funded due to the system in place where property taxes ultimately determine a large portion of funding. This leaves poor and working class districts out to dry while making sure the wealthiest districts receive the most public funding. It ensures that the districts that need the least amount of public funding receive the most and vice versa

Divestment from our already unequal funding system would only exacerbate the problem, as the money transferred via vouchers in many cases where voucher programs have already been implemented often do not cover the entire cost of tuition. That would occur because either the voucher simply doesn’t cover the entire cost of current tuition, or because of private schools raising tuition fees in response to said programs. This comes as a direct result of the lack of oversight regarding where the funds go and how they’re used.

This has been a key issue since the school choice movement’s origins in the aftermath of Brown vs the Board of Education. As integration in public schools was enforced by federal law, white people in the South flocked to private schools that were de facto segregated in backlash to the ruling. The legacy of the “segregation academies” exists to this day, as many private schools — especially religious ones — in the South can trace their origins back to the backlash against school integration. It is no coincidence that the push for school vouchers often advocates for funding private religious schools, because, after all, “putting God back in the classroom” has been a conservative rallying cry for decades.

One of the main arguments school choice activists make is that private education is more efficient and educates children better than public schools. While it’s true that many private schools tend to have better test score averages than public ones, it is likely a result of the fact that private schools have the right to exclude students at will, making it so that its students are often overwhelmingly upper middle class or wealthier. However, private schools have little to no government oversight, which often leads to private schools being more prone to pushing certain agendas.

While the movement for school choice has never been larger, it’s been a thorn in public education’s side for decades. As Arizona, Florida and several other states that have already managed to implement voucher programs, there is a growing concern that it’ll expand nationwide, as former Secretary of Education Betsy Devos tried to put it into practice. In a country where the vast majority of people rely on free and accessible education, siphoning money from public education into unreliable alternatives would only jeopardize the already unstable state of public schools across the country. Every dollar spent is a dollar taken from a struggling school.

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About the Contributor
Felipe Castro
Felipe Castro, Reporter
Junior Felipe Castro is a reporter and this is his second year on staff. He enjoys watching old movies, writing songs and playing guitar.

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