Hebron High School News Online

The Hawk Eye

Hebron High School News Online

The Hawk Eye

Hebron High School News Online

The Hawk Eye

Sports Scores
A table is set up with trophies for the participants for the tournament at last year’s event on May 31, 2023.  (Photo provided by HBBC)
Band to hold golf tournament May 31
Mie Bakuya, Reporter • May 25, 2024

The band program will hold its eighth annual golf tournament on May 31 at Indian Creek Golf Course with a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. The event...

(Left to right) DFW residents Ana Szabo, Lacey Gee, Amy Nichols and Nick Adams pose for a photo at their event “Swifties in the Park” at Grandscape in The Colony on April 27. At the event, they held competitions ,such as spelling bees and “finish the lyric” for the attendees, in which winners were given vinyls and a goodie bag from the Swiftie Market. (Photo provided by @the13podcast on Instagram)
Lucky Number 13
Saahir Mawani, Design Editor • May 24, 2024

On Dec. 13, 1989, global phenomenon Taylor Swift was bornin the town of Reading, PA. Only two years later, in 1992, the KiddKradick morning show...

Senior Jimmy Sanchez and junior Grant Koch perform a scene during a dress rehearsal of “The Diviners” on April 18. This was the only show strictly performed by theater’s Silver Company this year.
For the applause
Krista Fleming, Managing Editor • May 23, 2024

The stage is dark.  Junior Grant Koch is in the same spot he has been in for what feels like a thousand times, surrounded by cast members...

Weather


  • 1 AM
    76 °
  • 2 AM
    75 °
  • 3 AM
    74 °
  • 4 AM
    73 °
  • 5 AM
    72 °
  • 6 AM
    72 °
  • 7 AM
    73 °
  • 8 AM
    75 °
  • 9 AM
    77 °
  • 10 AM
    80 °
  • 11 AM
    82 °
  • 12 PM
    83 °
  • 1 PM
    84 °
  • 2 PM
    84 °
  • 3 PM
    82 °
  • 4 PM
    80 °
  • 5 PM
    78 °
  • 6 PM
    78 °
  • 7 PM
    77 °
  • 8 PM
    76 °
  • 9 PM
    76 °
  • 10 PM
    75 °
  • 11 PM
    75 °
  • 12 AM
    75 °
  • 1 AM
    75 °
June 19
86°/ 72°
Patchy rain nearby
June 20
89°/ 74°
Partly Cloudy
June 21
92°/ 76°
Partly Cloudy
Print Edition

Opinion: Feeling seen

The entertainment industry needs more positive and realistic representation
There+is+a+lack+of+positive+and+realistic+representation+in+the+entertainment+industry%2C+an+issue+that+needs+to+be+resolved+so+that+everyone+can+find+themselves+within+a+character+on+the+big+screen.
Siya Patel
There is a lack of positive and realistic representation in the entertainment industry, an issue that needs to be resolved so that everyone can find themselves within a character on the big screen.

I have always loved watching movies and TV shows. 

The feeling of being immersed within the world one is experiencing through the screen is like no other. I have frequently found myself with the desire to be there alongside the characters in a movie or show I’ve been watching. For most, the closest way to experience that feeling is by trying to see themselves in a character within the show — a character that makes someone feel truly represented.

But not everyone has found a character they can see themselves in; I know I haven’t.

I didn’t grow up seeing relatable representations of myself in shows or movies from my childhood. If there was a South Asian character, they were portrayed as nerds or kids that are made fun of. I never got to see someone who looked like me play a character that was considered “cool.”

I wanted to be exactly like the people I saw on the screen, but, deep down, I thought I couldn’t.

In order to prevent upcoming generations from feeling the same way, there has been an increase in representation and inclusivity in the entertainment industry. This is a step in the right direction and will make a notable difference, but it must be executed well.

An unsuccessful attempt at accurately bringing diversity to the screen would be a show that I grew up on, “Jessie.” The character of Ravi (Karan Brar) was portrayed as the smart Indian kid who was a little weird and quirky. I rarely got to see any other side to him. Similar shows have done a disservice to the industry. While they make for great entertainment and create core childhood memories, they also play a big part in harmful stereotypes being widely accepted in TV shows or movies.

Making TV shows enjoyable shouldn’t come at the price of seeing accurate representation for the characters and actors included.

Shows like “One Day,” “Never Have I Ever” and “Bridgerton” have done a good job at being inclusive. These shows made it feel as though the characters were made for and personalized to suit the actors who were playing the roles, instead of them being thrown into playing characters they don’t identify with. The roles feel thought out and crafted with the intent of being more inclusive.

These pieces of media have helped alleviate some of the stereotypes that come with South Asian characters in movies or TV shows. After being showcased as “nerds” or “the best friend” for so long, I finally get to see myself in the light as main characters — characters that are considered “cool” and attractive enough to get the guy.

It’s shows like these that make me feel seen and appreciated for who I am, and not what others perceive me as.

While there has been more diversity within the entertainment industry, the only thing that will truly make a difference is more positive representation. Hopefully, the next group of kids, no matter what their background, will truly get the chance to find themselves within a character on the big screen.

Leave a Comment
More to Discover
About the Contributor
Siya Patel
Siya Patel, Reporter
Sophomore Siya Patel is a reporter and this is her first year on staff. She enjoys listening to music and traveling with her family.

Comments (0)

“The Hawk Eye” comment section welcomes engagement from readers. Within the comment section, we are dedicated to maintaining a respectful community; therefore, we reserve the right to protect the website from: derogatory comments, comments deemed to be spam, comments that include links that lead to harmful websites, comments using vulgar language and statements that attack another person. “The Hawk Eye” has the right to protect the website through removing comments that are viewed as harmful. We will make every effort to maintain the integrity of the comment section by allowing as many comments as possible, but if a comment violates the comment policy, we reserve the right to edit or delete the comment at any time without notice. If you feel your comment has been excluded, edited or removed by error, please contact us through our contact form.
All The Hawk Eye Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *